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Children’s Development and Well-being

Effect of social interventions

Which social interventions help children and adolescents? Which factors influence whether the interventions succeed? These are two of the questions that SFI – the Danish National Centre for Social Research will attempt to answer in the project Children’s Development and Well-being – Database and Analysis.

SFI will monitor 30,000 children from early childhood to adulthood. The project will measure the well-being and cognitive development of children and other parameters by systematically collecting data. The data will be entered into a database, the first of this type in Denmark. The lack of this type of data has often delayed or prevented social and health-related analysis and intervention projects related to children and adolescents.

The database will establish a basis for measuring the impact of highly specialized initiatives such as placing children in out-of-home care; broader social and welfare policy initiatives such as those targeting deprived housing areas; and more universal initiatives such as child-care institutions, schools and leisure activities. The potential of the database for long-term data registration and analysis will provide a solid foundation for dimensioning and validating social and welfare initiatives related to children and adolescents in Denmark. The database will be accessible to both public and private organizations.

Thomas Alslev Christensen, Head of Operations, Novo Nordisk Foundation, says: “Following this large group of children and the data that will be collected over time in a database will provide a solid foundation for evaluating social and welfare initiatives for children and adolescents in Denmark. The project’s focus on establishing a baseline for a large group of children that, in principle, can be followed from childhood to adulthood has an exciting and long-term perspective that has not previously been studied in Denmark.”

The Novo Nordisk Foundation has awarded DKK 5.985 million to the Children’s Development and Well-being project.